Search Past Articles
Explore Past Articles
Haz Mat "Specialist Course"
« Mortuary Response to VHF - 2 | Main | VHF - Dress-out Doffing and removal of CPC »
Monday
Sep032018

Mortuary Response to VHF 1

The Mortuary Program was developed because of the need to limit contamination by viral attacks upon a geographic location through disease. The mortuary response of the 2014 West Africa outbreak was found to be a major contribution towards the control of large scale pandemics. The rate of disease spread became so fast that increased safe burial protection was found to be a major contributor towards controlling this disease platform.

When a large scale epidemic of a VHF (Viral Hemorrhagic Fever) outbreak presents itself, a mortuary team shall be needed. This will involve safe burial techniques. There is a HIGH risk of transmission in the health care facility when a VHF patient dies as the bodily remains and body fluids of deceased VHF patients remain contagious for several days after death. Family and community members are also at risk if burial practices involved touching and washing the body. Therefore the body must be safely prepared for the actual burial procedure. The Mortuary Team must be made aware of general concepts to keep in mind before the procedure is actuated.

The Mortuary Team members shall need to be trained in the proper “Donning, Doffing and Decontamination Techniques” as the actual patient care members were during our former series of articles on VHF Response Techniques. (See archives). To develop a long term strategy, Mortuary Team members should be included in the base training and all operational training long before deployment. This will mean inclusion in the “Team” operations, training, and general upkeep of a response organization. Do not include contractors that have not participated in your response organizations structure. Inclusion into your Team structure will insure adequate resources and deployable entities that are practicing your “safe” operations throughout the incident.

When highly infectious agents are released epidemics (highly infected local areas) will require a mortuary team to prevent a pandemic (globally infected area) from resulting. Global incidents such as the 2014 West Africa pandemic can stress world-wide resources beyond their limits leading to historic changes. A mortuary team can limit these global changes from becoming world affects.

Local response is generally the best practice for this, as they already have a positive relationship with the general population. This becomes critical during an incident when consoling and passing needed information onto this citizenry. Local “Teams” generally have a much more positive affect with the local patients when the transfer of critical information regarding VHF is needed to insure containment of a possible pandemic.

Safe burial techniques are paramount to limit further contamination and death to the remaining population. Since the infection rate continues after death, due to the high rate of still infectious bodily fluids remaining after death, the need for rapid burial practices need to be implemented by the mortuary team members. In the coming months we shall demonstrate the proper techniques for all Mortuary Team members to follow.

To begin this process, there are three major rules to adopt into your Team structure for the concept process when interacting with the local citizenry. First and foremost the Teams’ emphasis should always be focused on the burial taking place as SOON as possible AFTER the body is prepared. To accomplish this goal, there are three (3) main concepts that should form the basis of a Mortuary Team’s response;

1] Be aware of the family’s cultural practices and religious beliefs. Help the family understand why some of their traditional practices cannot be done because they place the family and citizenry at risk for exposure.

2] Counsel the family about why special steps need to be taken to protect the family and community from illness. If the body is prepared without giving information and support to the family and community, they may not want to bring other family members to the health facility in the future. They may think that if the patient dies, the body will not be returned to them.

3] Identify a family member who has influence with the rest of the family and who can make sure family members avoid dangerous practices such as washing or touching the body.

Next month; Ebola 2014 West Africa “Outbreak” Issues lessons learned for future responses.

Haz Mat Mike

 

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend