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Haz Mat "Specialist Course"
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Tuesday
Feb032015

On-Line Haz-Mat "Specialist" Course Now Available!

With the addition of the “new” on-line Hazardous Materials “Specialist” course to the Madonna University Emergency Management Baccalaureate Program, I thought it would be a good time to list the course directives.  This course is now available to Emergency Responders not in the University system wishing to increase their Hazardous Materials Response future.

This course is also an excellent asset to those in the Environmental Field moving into promotional positions. The skills mastered in this course prepare the individual for command responsibilities within any organization. At least one (1) Hazardous Materials “Specialist” should be the responsible person on-site involved in the ultimate decision making for the incident/operation.

This Training course is also offered at a reduced rate for those seeking “Certification” in this discipline who is “not” involved with the Emergency Management Baccalaureate Degree Program.

This course meets and EXCEEDS the standards for the EPA 165.15 course competencies. Students upon successful completion (a grade of C or better) are awarded the Hazardous Materials “Specialist” certificate. This certificate is in good standing as long as “refresher” Training is completed within the mandated time periods every one (1) to three (3) years, or as directed by the employer. It should be remembered by all Emergency Responders that the “Employer” is responsible for the liability of compliance and ultimate operational certification. Course certification designates the student as a successful graduate of the program.

Madonna University Hazardous Materials Specialist Workshop

 

Prepare to be a Hazardous Materials Specialist

 

The hazardous materials – specialist workshop (OSH 4180) is delivered online and on campus, and is limited to the first 12 students. Upon satisfactory completion of this workshop you will receive a certificate of training.

 

Highlights

The workshop consists of reading assignments, research papers, video exercises and online discussion boards. Upon completion of at least 24 hours of training, students should:

  •          understand and be able to implement a local emergency response plan

 

  •          have a thorough concept of hazardous materials classification, identification and verification by using advanced survey instruments

 

  •          know and be able to implement the State of Jurisdiction emergency response plan

 

  •          be able to select and use the proper specialized chemical personal protective equipment  (PPE  )

 

  •          be able to perform set-up, coordinate specialized control, containment and confinement operations for any incident site

 

Gain Employable Skills

At Madonna University, your success is our greatest achievement. The Hazardous Material – Specialist Workshop provides students with employable skills for preparing for, responding to, mitigating and recovering from natural, manmade and technological incidents. While the duties of a Hazardous Materials Specialist (HMS) parallel those of hazardous material technicians, they also require a more directed and specific knowledge of the various substances an HMS may be called upon to contain and mitigate. The HMS also acts as the site liaison to federal, state, local and other government authorities with regard to all site activities. The HMS is commonly in command or managing all field operations and serves as the responsible overseer in charge of operational integrity.

 

Prerequisites

In order to register for the workshop you must have either:

  •          A HAZMAT Technician Certificate, or
  •          Completed Madonna’s HAZMAT II course

 

Convenient and Affordable Training

To accommodate your busy work schedule, this class is offered online with a few on-campus meetings from May 6 through July 22. 

 

If you are not seeking a degree in emergency management, you can take this "Certificate" course for non-credit at a reduced cost. Please contact the below program director below for details.

 

For Program Information:

Paul DeNapoli, program director

734-432-5523

800-852-4951 (ext. 5523)

pdenapoli@madonna.edu


Hazardous Materials “Specialist”

Course proficiencies

The Hazardous Materials Specialist is an individual who responds with and provides support to hazardous materials “technicians.” Their duties parallel those of hazardous materials technicians, however their duties require a more “directed” or “specific” knowledge of the various substances they may be called upon to contain. The hazardous materials “specialist” would also act as the site liaison’ between Federal, State, Local, and other government authorities in regards to all site activities. This may be seen as an oversight person for operational integrity. Hazardous materials “Specialists” shall have received at least 24 hours of training equal to the technician (under (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.1200) level and in addition have received instructional competencies in the following areas and that the employer shall so certify:

1] The “Specialist” shall “know” and be able to implement his/her local emergency response plan.

2] Have a thorough understanding of classification, identification, and verification of known and unknown materials by using and understanding advanced survey instruments and all ancillary equipment for those instruments.

3] The “Specialist” shall “know” and be able to implement the State of Jurisdiction, emergency response plan.

4] Be able to select and use the proper specialized chemical personal protective equipment provided to the hazardous materials “Specialist.”

5] Understand, “know”, and be able to explain in-depth hazard and risk techniques and “risk assessment” techniques.

6] Be able to perform, set-up, and coordinate specialized control, containment, and confinement operations within the capabilities of the resources and personal protective equipment available.

7] Be able to determine and implement “advanced” decontamination procedures.

8] Have the ability to develop and implement a site safety and control plan for any incident site.

9] Understand and be able to implement to the team, chemical, radiological, and toxicology terminology and behavior.

It is strongly recommended that the Hazardous Materials “Specialist” occupies at least one role in the Command General Staff for continuity and oversight operational integrity.  “Specialists” are commonly seen in Command or as Liaison’ Officers within the ICS structure.

Weekly Work Requirements

Weekly work shall consist of a three (3) prong structure. Each week the data research shall delve into another specialized area of responsibility of the hazardous materials “Specialist”. However the three (3) prong format shall remain for student consistency. They are;

1] Student reading – consisting of chapter reading, weekly course documents, and outside links to Federal Documents.

2] Discussion Board – here the students will reflect on readings, answer questions, state their concepts, and critique at least two (2) other fellow students posts on these issues.

3] Video Links – here the student shall view a new hazardous materials video, (or table-top scenario) each week in the assignments section. The student shall reply to issues involving the incident, (or scenario) as to what was correct or incorrect, via the Discussion Board. The student shall be graded on these assignments using creativity and care in the deployment of safe operating procedures.

4] Student final grade evaluation shall be the above plus additional dissertation papers as directed from the particular weeks information and study.

 

Weekly Study Plan for HMS (Hazardous Materials “Specialist”) Program

Week 1 – Knowing how and demonstrating the ability to implement the employer’s Emergency Response Plan. Here the student will learn the advanced techniques needed to implement their employer’s emergency response plan as if they were the senior “Specialist” responsible during an emergency crisis. This tabletop scenario shall involve multiple chemicals being released at their facility or response area. The table top will contain a map and the location of the chemical release. The student shall be completely responsible for their tabletop scenario, fellow student/employees lives, and safety during the emergency, and any outside contractors they choose to call upon for assistance during the emergency. The student shall be responsible for all aspects of implementation. The discussion board shall be a time log of activities from beginning to end. Points shall be awarded for positive actions taken and points deducted for poor decisions resulting in additional safety risk.

Week 2 – Knowing the classification, identification, and verification of known and unknown materials by using the correct field survey instruments and equipment. Here the student will study, evaluate, and choose a variety of instruments to determine each of the four (4) EPA hazard classifications; Ignitability, Corrosivity, Toxicity and Reactivity. These wastes are those that have not been specifically listed under the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) but are still considered hazardous wastes if they exhibit one of these four classifications known as “Characteristic Wastes” under 40 CFR Part 261 Subpart C.

  1.       Ignitability – Ignitable wastes can create fires under certain conditions, are spontaneously combustible, or have a flash point less than 60 degrees Centigrade (140 F). Examples are waste oil and used solvents. For further details see 40 CFR S261.21
  2.       Corrosivity – Corrosive wastes are acids or bases (alkaline pH less than or equal to 2, or greater than or equal to 12.5) these are capable or corroding metal containers such as storage tanks, drums and barrels. Battery acid is an example. For further details see 40 CFR S261.22
  3.       Reactivity – Reactive wastes are unstable under “normal” conditions. They can cause explosions, toxic fumes, gases, or vapors when heated, compressed, or mixed with water. Examples are lithium-sulfur batteries or explosives. For further details see 40 CFR S261.23
  4.       Toxicity – Toxic wastes are harmful or fatal when ingested or absorbed such as, mercury or lead. When toxic wastes are land disposed, contaminated liquid may “leach” from the waste and pollute ground water. Ground water may be a drinking aquifer or food chain hydration. Toxicity is defined through a laboratory procedure called TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). For further details see 40 CFR S261.24

The student shall compare the “latest and greatest” equipment and instrumentation that modern technology has to offer, define and describe their operational principles, and field operation. The student shall demonstrate knowledge learned through comparison, choose a preferred instrument, and describe its superior attributes for hazardous materials identification.

Week 3 – Knowing how to implement the “regional” or County Emergency Response Plan. Here the student shall demonstrate by example and explanation the function from initial response to termination at incident site of the County Emergency Response Plan and its members from their respective areas. The goal is to teach the specialist the exact response expectations he/she can expect at an incident site when County or “Regional” resources are requested. A structured comparison between local emergency response plans and personnel expected to actual members responding shall be made. The student shall be responsible for establishing a staging area for a County/Regional response and shall serve as the site liaison to these agencies. Critical thinking shall be performed involving a planned response for these resources when they arrive. The student shall form “objectives of responsibility” for the role of a County/Regional response.

Week 4 – Functioning within an assigned role in the incident command system. Here the student shall be assigned a particular role within the IC system and demonstrate the responsibility for all aspects throughout an incident response. Command accountability, recordkeeping, and communication shall be the key areas of concern of this section. The student shall keep a log for a 24hour work period and compile the data in a timeline to be added into the final incident report for his/her branch section.

Week 5 – becoming integrated into the liaison position and implementing the State of Jurisdiction Emergency Response Plan. Here the “Specialist” shall be faced with an incident that deteriorates to the point where State Emergency Response plans are activated. The Specialist shall advise the IC of the situation and form a liaison between State Resources and the IC’s General and Command Staff. The Specialist shall be responsible for hosting an initial Command Staff meeting to explain the details and the response implications when and how State Resources shall arrive. The Specialist shall inform the IC’s Staff of where the State Resources shall fit into the ICS. The Specialist shall develop an additional Staging platform; within incident staging officers established staging receiving area or facility.

Week 6 – Being to properly select and use specialized CPC (Chemical Protective Clothing) and the equipment ensemble’ provided for each particular chemical hazard response. The specialist shall create a study of all four (4) levels of protection clothing involving modern available vendor resources. The specialist shall be given three (3) chemicals involved in a single response incident, and outline the choices of all four (4) levels studied. The specialist shall create an IAP (Incident Action Plan) integrating all four of their choices into the incident throughout the entire incidents timeline. The specialist shall dissect each CPC choice for the needed elements of response technicians; work-ability, durability, permeation and heat-stress factors affecting his/her technicians. The specialist shall be given the location and weather conditions for this incident planning procedure.

Week 7 – Understanding in-depth hazard and risk techniques. Here the student shall be given three (3) specific incidents for hazard analysis. The student shall devise an IAP (Incident Action Plan) concerning itself with hazard and risk techniques. The student shall detail and explain these techniques to entry team technicians via a pre-entry safety briefing. One briefing with complete explanations shall be made for each incident given. Entry team technicians (fellow students) shall (reply to post via discussion board) to answer all questions and concerns before any entry is made.

Week 8 – Here the student/specialist will be responsible for the research and specific knowledge needed to perform specialized control and containment operations within the options given for various containers. These shall range from three (3) primary hazardous container types affecting large volumes of the citizenry in the hopes of avoiding large scale evacuation from homes and businesses. The student shall be responsible for and demonstrate the skill knowledge to mitigate and instruct “Technicians” in the operation and procedure of containing leaks in 1) Railcars, 2) Industrial piping, and 3) Highway tankers. Each of these techniques involves a different form of mitigation and application of containment kits or procedures. The student shall explain, in detail, the procedure for operating each of these “kits/procedures” so that this knowledge can be passed to the technician responders.

Week 9 - Here the student shall be responsible for the research and specific knowledge needed to perform specialized “confinement” operations within the options given for various areas. Waterway spills, soil spills, and roadway spills to storm water drains shall be covered. For each of the three types, confinement to a sacrificed area limits environmental contamination, limits food chain leachate contamination, and limits ground water drinking contamination. The student shall be responsible for and demonstrate the skill knowledge to mitigate and instruct “Technicians” in the proper procedure for hazardous material environmental mitigation.

Week 10 – Being responsible for developing any particular decontamination procedure given the resources available and implementation of the correct decontamination procedure for the hazard involved. Here the student shall be given three (3) separate contamination sites and shall develop a specific decontamination “line” and specific operational procedure to each system, on a case by case basis. The student shall be responsible for the decontamination line design, set-up, and mitigation instructions to his/her technicians by submitting instructional decontamination training guidelines for his/her technicians in the field.

Week 11 – Having the ability to determine and develop a site safety control plan. Here the student shall be given a scenario response that they shall be responsible for the design and creation of all aspects of a site safety and control plan. This shall be submitted in a structured format just as an EPA inspector would evaluate on a hazardous materials site.

Week 12 – Understanding Chemical Terminology and Behavior. From the student textbook, the Specialist shall be given a list of 20 Chemical Terms. The Specialist shall then be responsible for the clarification of each definition through instruction to his/her Technicians before responding to this type of event. Often, the Specialist is responsible for Team “refreshers” and ongoing team training.  This exercise shall aid the “Specialist” in finding his/her instructional technique. 

Week 13 – Understanding Radiological Terminology and Behavior. From the student textbook, the Specialist shall be given a list of 20 Radiological Terms. The Specialist shall then be responsible for the clarification of each definition through instruction to his/her Technicians before responding to this type of event. Often, the Specialist is responsible for Team “refreshers” and ongoing team training. This exercise shall aid the “Specialist” in finding his/her instructional technique.

Week 14 – Understanding Toxicological Terminology and Behavior. From the student textbook, the Specialist shall be given a list of 20 Toxicological Terms. The Specialist shall be responsible for the clarification of each definition through instruction to his/her Technicians before responding to this type of event. Often, the Specialist is responsible for Team “refreshers” and ongoing team training. This exercise shall aid the “Specialist” in finding his/her instructional technique.            

 

 

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